Laboratory

Mason Health's Laboratory Team is dedicated to superior levels of customer service and is focused on personalized laboratory services for each patient. We work closely with your provider to promptly diagnose and treat diseases by offering compassionate sample acquisition and quality results.

Mason Health Laboratory Services

Phone
1-360-426-1611 Option 7
hours
  • Mason Clinic Lab: M-F: 7:30 am to 5 pm, closed 12 to 1 pm for lunch

Lab Results

If you are looking for laboratory results, please call Medical Records at 360-427-9587 or visit the Medical Records Office at 2505 Olympic Highway North, Suite 410 in Shelton.

Notice

Due to low staffing, you may experience longer wait times. We apologize for any inconvenience.

Billing & Insurance Questions

For billing questions, call (360) 427-3601. If you need help paying your bill or signing up for insurance, call 360-432-7790 or 360-432-7766.

Mason Health Lab Services - Draw Station at Mason Clinic

1701 N. 13th Street 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed 12 to 1 pm for lunch Monday through Friday 360-426-2653

Interested in a career in Medical Laboratory Science?

Whether you want to get your foot in the door of the medical laboratory world as a phlebotomist or you are dreaming of working in a health care field where you can put your puzzle-solving skills to good use as a lab tech or lab scientist, a career in medical laboratory science might be one to consider.

Mason Health offers an annual scholarship to one Shelton High School Health Sciences Academy graduate who enters the medical laboratory field. Mason Health pays for the 10-week course for a phlebotomist license and guarantees employment directly after graduation.

Mason Health also offers a $5,000 signing bonus to anyone who applies and is accepted for a job in our Laboratory Department.

Come join one of the fastest-growing fields in health care! Learn more about the different positions below!

Website Headers Phlebotomist

Employment of phlebotomists is projected to grow 22 percent from 2020 to 2030, much faster than the average for all occupations, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

About 19,500 openings for phlebotomists are projected each year, on average, over the next decade. Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire.

What Does a Phlebotomist Do?

Phlebotomists take samples of blood for testing. The blood samples may be needed to learn more about a particular patient, or they may be used in research. Phlebotomists also collect blood from donors for those in need of blood transfusions.

Most blood is taken from veins, but phlebotomists must also learn how to draw blood from capillaries. They use capillary sampling when a small amount of blood is needed. Phlebotomists sometimes handle other types of specimens.

Where Can I Receive Training for Phlebotomy?

Phlebotomy, or working as a Lab Assistant, is an entry-level position. Local programs include:


Scholarship Opportunity

Mason Health offers an annual scholarship to one Shelton High School Health Sciences Academy graduate who decides to become a phlebotomist. Mason Health pays for the 10-week course for a phlebotomist license and guarantees employment directly after graduation. Contact a school counselor at Shelton High School for more information.

Academies logo
Website Headers Medical Lab Technician

Employment of medical laboratory technicians is projected to grow 11 percent from 2020 to 2030, faster than the average for all occupations, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

About 25,900 openings for both medical laboratory technicians and medical lab scientists/technologists are projected each year, on average, over the decade.


What Does a Medical Lab Technician Do?

Hospitals and doctors’ offices depend on the important work of medical lab technicians. They work under the supervision of physicians, lab managers or lab technologists to conduct lab tests on specimens. The work they do behind-the-scenes helps doctors detect diseases or illnesses and determine treatment options.

Medical lab technicians perform lab tests or chemical analyses of body fluids using a microscope or other advanced lab equipment, which help medical lab technicians detect abnormalities or diseases. Medical lab techs also set up, maintain, clean and sterilize lab equipment, prepare solutions, collect blood or tissue from patients and they may also search for parasites, bacteria and microorganisms with lab equipment.


Where Can I Receive Training to become a Medical Lab Technician?
  • Clover Park Technical College in Lakewood/Tacoma offers an Associate's Degree program, of which Medical Lab Tech courses make up about 4 to 7 quarters (2 to 3 quarters of General Education courses are needed beforehand if you do not have an existing Associate's Degree). Learn more about the CPTC program in the video below, which features Mason Health's Brittany Smith!
  • Mason Health offers continuing education/tuition reimbursement programs for employees seeking to further their education.

Website Headers Medical Lab Scientist

Medical laboratory scientists are like the detectives of the health care world. They look for clues that can shed light on the diagnosis and treatment of a disease or injury.

Employment of medical laboratory technicians is projected to grow 11 percent from 2020 to 2030, faster than the average for all occupations. About 25,900 openings for both medical laboratory technicians and medical lab scientists/technologists are projected each year, on average, over the decade.

What Does a Medical Lab Scientist/Technologist Do?

Medical laboratory scientists are trained to use sophisticated equipment like microscopes, hematology analyzers and incubators. The data they find plays an important role in identifying and treating diseases like cancer, diabetes, and other medical conditions.

About 60 to 70 percent of decisions regarding diagnosis, treatment, admission, and discharge are based on the results of the medical laboratory scientist’s work, according to WebMD.

Both technicians and technologists perform tests and procedures that physicians and surgeons or other healthcare personnel order. However, technologists perform more complex tests and laboratory procedures than technicians do. Laboratory technologists and technicians log data from medical tests and enter results into a patient’s medical record and discuss results and findings of laboratory tests and procedures with physicians.


Where Can I Receive Training to become a Medical Lab Scientist/Technologist?
  • The University of Washington offers an undergraduate program in Seattle.
  • Online programs are offered nationwide.
  • Mason Health offers continuing education/tuition reimbursement programs for employees seeking to further their education.