Mason General Hospital Visiting Hours

8:00 am to 8:30 pm, daily

Telephone

Shelton:
(Main Hospital Campus)
(360) 426-1611
Toll-Free (855) 880-3201

Location

Physical Address:
901 Mountain View Dr
Shelton WA 98584

Postal Address:
PO BOX 1668
Shelton WA 98584

Our Family of Clinics:

Visiting Hours

Father/Partner

Unlimited visiting hours.

Family and friends

Normal Hospital visiting hours: 8:00 am - 8:30 pm

Call the Birth Center

(360) 427-9558

Birth Center Links

The Birth Center

at Mason General Hospital

Nine Months of Change and Wonder

1st Month of Pregnancy

Your Baby:

  • Becomes about an inch long.
  • His or her brain and nervous system are forming.
  • Heart and lungs are forming.
  • There are tiny spots for the eyes, ears and nose.
  • Arms and legs are little "buds".

You:

  • May not yet know you are pregnant.
  • Weight probably hasn't changed.
  • Your breasts may feel tender and tingly.
  • You may start feeling some nausea, especially in the morning (but it can be any time of the day).
  • You may feel sleepy or tired more often.

Things You Can Do:

  • Make an appointment to begin prenatal care. Call the Mason General Hospital & Family of Clinics Referral Line if you need help finding a doctor or midwife for your care.
  • Check with your doctor or midwife before taking any medications, including over-the-counter drugs. If you are taking street drugs, get help to stop now for the health of your child.
  • Avoid smoking and alcoholic beverages. If you find you cannot quit, please get help.
  • Eat a healthy diet - whole grain breads, tortillas, cereals, fruits, vegetables, milk products, and lean meat and fish or other sources of complete proteins.
  • Limit caffeine drinks - coffee, tea, and the many soda pops with caffeine.
  • Talk with the baby's father about your feelings about this pregnancy and having a child.
  • If you have a cat, have someone else clean the litter box to avoid a virus that can affect your baby.
  • Avoid using pesticides and aerosol sprays during your pregnancy.

2nd Month

Your Baby:

  • Grows to about 2 inches long and weighs ½ - 1 ounce.
  • There is a heartbeat.
  • The stomach, liver and kidneys are forming.
  • Fingers and toes are forming.

You:

  • May gain a pound or two and clothes may feel tight at the waist.
  • Breasts will begin to increase in size, and the area around the nipples starts to darken.
  • Uterus begins to crowd the bladder, and you have to urinate more often.
  • May have more nausea, sleepiness, and fatigue.

Things that you can do:

  • Get a prenatal checkup this month, and plan for regular checkups during the pregnancy. Expect to have blood drawn and a Pap test. This is a good time to be tested for vaginal infections and a complete medical history will be done. Talk to your healthcare provider about having a test for HIV.
  • Do not use alcohol, cigarettes, or street drugs. Please ask for help if you cannot quit on your own.
  • Avoid medications unless your healthcare provider has said they are safe. Take any prenatal vitamins and extra iron tablets prescribed.
  • Continue eating a good variety of foods, and avoiding caffeine and "junk" foods.
  • If you have morning sickness, try eating dry crackers, toast, or cereal before getting out of bed OR before the time of day your nausea usually starts.
  • Share any ideas and worries you may have with the baby's father or someone else supportive to you. It is usual to have some worries about becoming a parent.

3rd Month

Your Baby:

  • Measures about 6 inches long and weighs about 4 ounces.
  • There is a placenta and umbilical cord that is circulating blood to nourish the baby.
  • The baby moves, but is too small for you to feel it. Reflex movements allow elbows and knees to bend, and fingers to form a fist.
  • The baby's heart beats at about 120 - 160 beats per minute.
  • Ears, arms, hands, fingers, legs, feet, and toes are well formed by the end of this month.

You:

  • May have gained 2 - 4 pounds.
  • Appetite may increase.
  • May become constipated.
  • May sweat more easily and feel warm more often.
  • May be happy and sad without any reason; you may feel more stressed at times.

Things that you can do:

  • Continue with your prenatal checkups.
  • Continue with the diet and healthy behaviors described above.
  • Drink at least 6 - 8 glasses of water a day. It is easy to become dehydrated when you are pregnant.
  • Get some activity every day, such as 15 minutes of walking.
  • Talk with your support people about your negative and positive feelings about your pregnancy.
  • As your abdomen grows, wear your seatbelt under your belly and low across the hips. The shoulder strap should go between your breasts and to the side of your abdomen. This is important protection for you and your baby in case of an accident.

4th Month

Your Baby:

  • Measures about 10 inches long and weighs about 12 ounces.
  • Your baby is moving more in his or her amniotic sac. Movements may become strong enough for you to feel.
  • Hair begins to appear on the head.
  • Eyebrows and eyelashes start to appear.

You:

  • May gain 3 - 4 pounds this month.
  • May be hungry more often and crave certain foods.
  • May feel less tired and enjoy being pregnant more.
  • Nipples and the area around them become much darker.
  • Pregnancy is starting to show.
  • Are more likely to get a urinary tract (bladder) infection; drinking lots of water decreases this risk.

Things that you can do:

  • At your prenatal checkup, you may be asked about taking a blood test that can determine if your baby is at risk for certain genetic conditions.
  • Continue your healthy diet and habits.
  • Lie down with your feet up for at least 30 minutes a day.
  • You may find you have changes in your sexual activity and interest. Talk with your partner about your feelings and your physical changes.
  • Make a dental appointment. The growing baby can deplete some of the nutrients that keep your teeth healthy.
  • You will find yourself needing some comfortable clothes for your changing body.

5th Month

Your Baby:

  • Measures about 12 inches long and weighs about 1½ pounds.
  • There is more hair.
  • A white creamy substance protects his or her skin.

You:

  • Will gain 3 - 4 pounds a month.
  • It is easier to feel the baby move. You will start to notice some patterns in the baby's activity.
  • Breasts grow bigger and softer, and veins start to show more. They may leak a small amount of a sticky substance called colostrum.
  • Constipation becomes more of a problem now.
  • Hair may feel thicker and a little more oily.
  • May have some feelings of not being able to cope. This can happen almost any time in pregnancy.

Things that you can do:

  • Continue your healthy diet and habits.
  • Find out about childbirth classes in your area.
  • Walk every day. Find out about and do Kegel and pelvic rocking exercises.
  • Take time to buy some well-fitting support bras.
  • Continue to rest every day. Your baby prefers for you to be on your side.
  • Continue to talk with your supportive people about hopes, fears, and upcoming responsibilities and plans.
  • Share the fun of being pregnant, too.

6th Month

Your Baby:

  • Measures 14 - 15 inches long and weighs about 2 - 2½ pounds.
  • Reacts to noises by moving or becoming quiet.
  • Can kick, cry, and hiccup.
  • Can open and close eyelids, and the eyes are almost completely developed.

You:

  • May have occasional heartburn.
  • May start to notice some tightening and relaxing of your uterus. These Braxton-Hicks contractions prepare your uterus for labor and are normal. (Call your healthcare provider if they become closer, stronger, regular, and painful over a period of a few hours, though.)
  • Sex drive may increase or decrease. This can change from week to week.
  • Stretch marks may show up.
  • Nausea should be almost gone and your appetite good. You should continue to gain 3 - 4 pounds every month.
  • May find yourself thinking more often about your baby and/or having dreams about your baby.
  • May have worries about your baby or about labor — most women do. Talk with your support people and your healthcare provider, as needed.

Things that you can do:

  • Get your checkups on time, even if you feel great.
  • Find out about breastfeeding. Ask about anything you may do now to improve flat or inverted nipples if you plan to breastfeed. (See our link to breastfeeding information.)
  • Continue all of your healthy diet, fluids, habits, activity, and rest.
  • Start collecting items for your baby's first weeks. Make sure you have an approved car seat. (See our link for what to bring to the hospital.)
  • Take time to talk about how your body is changing.

7th Month

Your Baby:

  • Measures about 16 inches long and weighs about 2½ - 3 pounds.
  • Fingerprints are formed.
  • He or she moves a lot, kicks and stretches and has periods of sleeping and waking.
  • She or he sucks their thumb. The brain and nervous system are almost mature.

You:

  • Weight may increase faster.
  • Another person may be able to hear your baby's heartbeat by placing an ear on your abdomen.
  • May notice some swelling of your feet, ankles and hands by the end of the day. This should go away while you sleep.
  • May need to wear bra pads if you are leaking enough fluid to make you feel uncomfortable without them.
  • May feel more tired. You may feel faint if you get up fast from lying down.
  • May feel more awkward.

Things that you can do:

  • During your prenatal check, be prepared for blood-glucose testing.
  • Continue your healthy eating, healthy habits, fluids, activity, and rest periods.
  • Tour the labor and delivery area where you want to deliver.
  • Start lists of things you'll need the first weeks home after the baby is born.
  • Think about who you will want with you for labor, and who you do not want. Talk with your support partner and prepare others for your choices.
  • Practice breathing and relaxation exercises from childbirth classes.

8th Month

Your Baby:

  • Measures about 18 inches long and weighs about 5½ pounds.
  • Is putting on weight faster.
  • Eyes are open.
  • May settle down into the birth position, especially if this is your first baby.

You:

  • May have a little trouble breathing with activity because of the baby pushing up on your lungs.
  • May have hemorrhoids.
  • Can feel parts of the baby through your abdominal wall.
  • May tire easily, urinate more, have trouble getting comfortable when sleeping — this month can be the most uncomfortable.

Things that you can do:

  • At your prenatal visit, expect to be tested for a bacteria called Group B Strep. It is fairly common, and is treated in labor with antibiotics to protect the baby at delivery.
  • Continue all those healthy habits.
  • Practice your childbirth exercises.
  • Make plans for someone to help you around the house for a few weeks after the baby's birth.
  • Make a birth plan. (See our link for a birth plan sample.)
  • Talk about baby names.
  • Think about what birth control you will choose after your baby is born.

9th Month

Your Baby:

  • Measures about 20 inches long and weighs about 6½ - 7½ pounds.
  • Settles into the birth position.
  • May seem quieter, as there is less space to move around in. (Call your healthcare provider if there is a sudden change in the baby's movement pattern.)
  • The baby continues to grow and gain weight.

You:

  • Wonder when this baby will be born.
  • Abdomen may look lopsided as the baby settles for birth.
  • May be tired, and may wake up at night to urinate or change positions.
  • Hands and feet may swell a little more.
  • May feel pressure low in your pelvis.
  • Are tired of being pregnant and ready for delivery.

Things that you can do:

  • Continue all of your healthy habits.
  • Avoid any long travel. Rest.
  • Pack what to take to the hospital. (See our link for suggestions on what to bring.)
  • List people and phone numbers to call when labor begins or after delivery.
  • Take time to treat yourself and your main support person to something special!